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90 Percent Of Kids In LA County’s Juvenile Halls Have “Open Mental Health Cases.” Supes Call Urgently For Rehabilitative Plan—For Youth & Adults

At Los Angeles County’s Central Juvenile Hall, the largest of the county’s three juvenile halls, 93 percent of its youth residents have open mental health cases.

At Barry J. Nidorf Juvenile Hall in Sylmar, CA, the percentage of kids with open mental health cases is at 96 percent, according to the most recent report submitted to the board of LA County Supervisors in late April by Jonathan Sharin, MD, the head of the county’s Department of Mental Health.

Teenage suicide sheds light on lack of oversight for juveniles in county jails

OKLAHOMA CITY — Before his death, 16-year old John Leroy Daniel Applegate was secluded from other juveniles in a cell in the Oklahoma County Detention Center.

The teenager also was placed on suicide watch intermittently during his time at the detention center before jailers ultimately found him unresponsive in his cell in April, said County Commissioner Carrie Blumert.

One Can Help saves taxpayers millions each year by helping juvenile court involved children and families quickly access missing resources.

Nonprofit's innovative program partners with juvenile court professionals to fill the gap in resources that impacts countless children in the juvenile court and child welfare systems. Their interventions have been credited with helping to reduce state's foster care, court, homelessness and dropout burdens, says study.

With fewer juvenile offenders locked up, an unexpected consequence arises for schools that teach them

Schopen teaches at a juvenile detention center for children serving time for committing felony crimes — assault, burglary, murder, manslaughter, arson. Four out of five students have mental-health or substance-abuse issues and struggle to control their emotions. About half have learning disabilities and are many grade levels behind. It’s hard to imagine a more difficult place to teach.

Youth often become homeless just after leaving juvenile detention. Can Washington state really stop it?

At least 1,800 youths were homeless or unstably housed within a year of exiting those systems, according to the most recent data available.

No other state has made such a sweeping commitment, according to experts, and Washington does not yet know how it will achieve it. But the state has an interest in ensuring today’s homeless youths don’t become the next generation of homeless adults, and officials are exploring solutions.