Watch: History of the Juvenile Justice System

America incarcerates more juveniles than any country in the world. 

In 2015, black children were five times more likely than white children to be incarcerated. So while 86 of 100,000 white children in the United States were behind bars, 433 of 100,000 black children found themselves locked up. To understand how we got here, let’s first examine the evolution of the juvenile justice system.

In partnership with WNYC, The Root presents Caught. Check out the #CaughtPodcast, and see the first of our three-part video series above.

Cuyahoga County looks to Dayton as model for rehabilitating youth, reducing juvenile crime

A Jan. 8 riot at the Juvenile Detention Center - coupled with a rise in violent crimes involving juveniles - has reignited calls for reform from O'Malley and city council members. The Cuyahoga County Juvenile Court's administrative judge said she would be open to a process to allow dangerous inmates to be held in a separate wing at the adult Cuyahoga County Jail. But that would require a change in state law, and advocates argue it would run counter to the juvenile court's core mission of rehabilitating young offenders.

O'Malley pointed to the Montgomery County Juvenile Court's Intervention Center as a possible inspiration for criminal justice reform in Cuyahoga County. The Intervention Center assesses young offenders in the hours after an arrest to determine if there are any underlying issues -- such mental health or behavioral issues, or problems at home or at school -- that could be addressed through specialized services.

Abuse, lies, videotape: A star employee at Miami’s juvenile lockup confesses to misconduct

Symon Gooding had been on the fast track at the Department of Juvenile Justice, having been promoted twice in as many years. With her bachelor’s degree in criminal justice — and credits toward a master’s in public administration — she seemed precisely the type of person administrators were looking for. They called her an agency “treasure.”

But in her upward climb in law enforcement, Gooding applied for a higher-paying job at the Miami Gardens Police Department that required a polygraph test.

Statistical Briefing Book Offers Data Snapshot on Girls in the Juvenile Justice System

OJJDP recently introduced a Data Snapshot series to its Statistical Briefing Book to disseminate current research and statistical information about youth in the juvenile justice system. Each one-page snapshot focuses on a specific topic and highlights policy-relevant findings. This new Data Snapshot focuses on trends and characteristics of girls at various stages in the juvenile justice system, including arrest, the juvenile court process, and residential placement.